Explore Manitou Springs History with the History Pockets
HP chest of drawers
This chest of drawers is full of historical artifacts from Manitou Springs’ history since 1840. Each drawer includes a collection of artifacts that tells something about a person or group of people. The challenge is to figure out who may have had some of these things in their pocket.
Visitors and students can select a drawer, and using the Artifact Analysis Worksheets on top of the chest, try to figure out what kind of person would have had these items, what they did in Manitou Springs, and in what time period they lived. Many of the artifacts are originals, some are duplicates, and some are fabricated.

 

HP open drawer

When everyone has had a chance to be a researcher, it is time to solve the mystery. In the binder labeled “Manitou Springs History Pockets,” students and visitors can look for the numbered tab that corresponds with the number written on a piece of paper in the drawer. Here they will find information about the objects themselves and about the people associated with them.

 

HP artifacts and binder
TEACHERS: We have prepared materials to make it simple to use the History Pockets in your classroom or to bring your class to the Manitou Springs Heritage Center.

Note that the narrative for each pocket is separated into three levels. The first section is aimed at an elementary audience with concrete information. The second section adds information the social setting of the people involved and is aimed at middle school students. Finally, the third section discusses the national and sometimes international context for understanding the import of the person represented by the artifacts in the pocket. The third section is directed at high school students and adults.

General Lesson Plan for the History Pockets from the Manitou Springs Heritage Center
This is a general plan that can be use with any age group and any of the “pockets.” Volunteers as the Heritage Center, class room teachers, and others are encouraged to use this lesson plan as a springboard for creating their own lesson plans.
I. Materials:
• The contents of the pocket
• The artifact analysis sheet
• Historic narratives for each pocket.
o Note that the narrative for each pocket is separated into three levels. The first section is aimed at an elementary audience with concrete information. The second section adds information the social setting of the people involved and is aimed at middle school students. Finally, the third section discusses the national and sometimes international context for understanding the import of the person represented by the artifacts in the pocket. The third section is directed at high school students and adults.
II. The Objectives:
• Students will handle and analyze historic artifacts.
• Students will have firsthand experience with original sources.
• Students learn to “think historically” about things they find.
• Students learn about a particular historical person or group in Manitou Springs history.
• Students will learn to see the history that surrounds them.

[Please add more specific objectives that meet the needs of the curriculum you are teaching!]

III. Method:
Depending on your goals and the number of students, pick out pockets that connect with your curricula or goals. For example, for a unit on Colorado history with a class of 28, you could pick out 7 pockets and assigned 4 students to a group.
1. Each group will use the Artifact Analysis Sheets to describe artifacts in the pocket. Teachers can select the questions they want their students to consider.
2. Students will then make some speculations about what kind of person used these artifacts and when that person might have lived. (You might give the groups a list of possibilities at the outset.)
3. Present each group with a fact sheet about their pocket which you have distilled from the narratives provided. They can see where they were correct and learn more, too. They can also list questions they would like to answer.
4. Have each group report what they have discovered about Manitou Springs history.
5. Have the class create a timeline of the pockets or compare people who lived at the same time.
6. Students can use the pockets to lead them to their own research or they can suggest possible pockets for the future.
IV. Possible themes for lessons:
• Manitou Springs, a gateway to the West
• The Founders of Manitou Springs
• Artists and Writers of Manitou Springs
• Geology and Water: Defining Human Development
• The Western Resort and Mineral Springs Cultures
• Trade and Commerce in the West 1780- present
• The Evolution of Transportation
• International Connections and Inventions
Please contact Molly Wingate at molly@wingate-consulting.com or 719-685-4114 to arrange for your class to visit the Heritage Center or to use the pockets come to your class.

History Pockets Titles, Eras and Themes
Each of the History Pockets addresses several themes in the history of Manitou Springs, the Pikes Peak Region and the West. Here is an overview of the themes for teachers to use to decide which pockets to use in their classes. Please contact Molly Wingate, molly@wingate-consulting.com or 719-685-4114 for more information.

Native Americans in Manitou 1830-40s Native culture, trade among whites and natives, trade route through Ute Pass, Native Americans and Spanish.
George Ruxton 1840’s Native American stories, Mountain Men, Manitou Valley
Before there was a town, hunting, wildlife, writing, interest in the area from other nations, exploring
William A. Bell 1860-70s exploring, mapping expeditions, founders of Manitou, fine architecture in Manitou, Railroading, English transiently in the West, devastation of fire, “women’s work” in Manitou as done by Cara Bell, Native Americans and early settlers.
Grace Greenwood 1880-90s travel writing, attracting tourists, accommodations, entertainments, women’s rights, abolition, excursions to other areas, outspoken women, famous acquaintances, first big flood of the town.
Archibald and Angus Gillis 1890s Construction in Manitou and El Paso County, Victorian architecture, immigrants to Manitou Springs, native building materials. Wealth in Manitou.

William E. Hook 1890-1910 early photography, immigration from England, Cog Railway, homesteading, scenes that made Manitou famous, tourist accommodations, Native Americans.
George Eber Duclo 1910s WW I war soldier from Manitou Springs, patriotism in Manitou, public art, public education in Manitou Springs, ordinary working class laborers in Manitou Springs, returning of remains.

Ida Nichols 1920s Fine hotels for the healthy people who came to Manitou – not the “Lungers,” family businesses, entertainments for visitors, baseball, hunting and fishing, menus, staff. Women in the hospitality field, Introduction of electricity, elevators, telephones. Famous people who stayed: Edison, Simmons

Dr. Creighton 1930-1960 practice of medicine, touted the health value of Manitou Springs and the springs. Involved in developing springs and health culture, TB patients and “the cure.” Geology and drilling for hot springs.

Maid at the Cliff House 1950s Economics, tourism, kids working in town, life in Manitou year round in the 1950s. Manitou schools.

Sponsors of the History Pockets Project Include: Inasmuch Foundation, The City of Manitou Springs, The Snyder Family Foundation, The Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce, The Manitou Springs Kiwanis Club, The American Legion Eber Duclo Post 39